library/

of what I’ve learned

This library contains collections and resources. A resource can be a link, book, podcast, video or anything that I’ve learned something from. They are curated into themed collections. Alternatively, here’s a simple list of books I’ve read and recommend.

book reviews

books with imported highlights

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collection (5)
Buddhism & Zen

books that informed and shaped my understanding of buddhist and zen philosophy

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collection (4)
Personal websites with a notes section

notes that are unedited /ideas-in-progress / short-form writing

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collection (3)
blogroll

blogs I enjoy reading

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book Goodreads
Balancing heaven and earth
by Robert A. Johnson, Jerry M. Ruhl completed: 06 Sep 2022

One of this century’s most popular psychology scholars, Robert A.Johnson was among the first to present Carl Jung’s rich but complex theories with simple elegance and grace,opening them to an entirely new and hungry audience…Balancing Heaven and Earth reveals, for the first time, Johnson’s own fascinating and mystical life-from his near-death experience at the age of eleven to the lifelong soul journey that has informed his writing and taught him how to live a spiritual life in the endlessly challenging modern world.

biography of Jungian Analyst, Robert A. Johnson.

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book Goodreads
Eat Sleep Sit
by Kaoru Nonomura completed: 20 Oct 2018

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She also taught me that it is important to store up energy during major life transitions. People rarely store up energy; almost everyone today has their energy mortgaged way into the future. I nurtured myself, trying not to make any major decisions and allowing my unconscious to wander wherever and however it would.

Source: Balancing heaven and earth by Robert A. Johnson, Jerry M. Ruhl | link

Evidently we must choose between anxiety and repression. If we cannot face the truth of our condition, which is mortality (or groundlessness, according to my Buddhist interpretation), we must forget that truth, which is to repress it. The difference between neurosis and normality — that undramatic, unnoticed psychopathology of the average, according to Maslow — is how successful that repression is. The neurotic has a better memory than most of us, so anxiety keeps breaking through into consciousness and must be dealt with more harshly in order to preserve some purchase on one’s fate, some circumscribed sphere of action.

Source: Lack and Transcendence: The Problem of Death and Life in Psychotherapy, Existentialism, and Buddhism by David R. Loy | link

For Becker, this is literally true: normality is our collective, protective madness, in which we repress the truth of the human condition, and those who have difficulty playing this game are the ones we call mentally ill…a paranoid is someone who knows a little of what’s going on. Psychoanalysis reveals the high price of denying this truth about man’s condition, what might be called “the costs of pretending not to be mad.”

Source: Lack and Transcendence: The Problem of Death and Life in Psychotherapy, Existentialism, and Buddhism by David R. Loy | link